We found – 18 articles for whole train

New York Perspectives

Urban Spree Galerie presents New York Perspectives, a duo show featuring Chris “Daze” Ellis and Joe Conzo, curated by Mode2. The vernissage will be on Friday, November 22nd, at 18:30, in presence of the two artists.

    Through the work of two New York City-born artists, a painter and a photographer, this exhibition is an attempt to show aspects of New York City life, through the eyes and the work of two very different individuals; though both come from a part of its counterculture.

    The drawings and paintings of the artist Chris “Daze” Ellis, and those many moments and people captured by the photography of Joe Conzo show us how the youth that were more in osmosis with the steel, the concrete, the glass, the streets and the city’s subway system, could develop new forms of visual dialogue that could form a bridge between their own social and cultural background, and a movement that would infiltrate the artworld and become a global phenonmenon.

   Coming from different neighbourhoods and cultural backgrounds, both have lived long enough to have witnessed first hand the huge transformations that the city has gone through over these last decades, while their “work”, which was actually their hobby, passion and life pretty much, has documented seminal eras during that time.

  These tumultuous years of cultural flux; of blossoming, blooming, destruction and rebirth, are often overlooked by today’s focus on the “now” of street art, and the way through which this eclipses the very alchemy that gave birth to the way in which artists express themselves in the street today, or the way in which they document city life.

    It is doubtful that much of what is happening today in visual art, music, dance and written or spoken word ever would have happened, if generations of youth in New York City had not lived what they did many decades ago; and we can count ourselves lucky that a few rare individuals happened to be there and have the instinct to document it.

  Here then, are views of New York from two different perspectives, they themselves being a complex accumulation of all of life’s experiences, and how they shape each individual’s understanding of the world around them; and the ways by which they choose to express and share this with us.

Urban Spree Prints will release two 18″x 24″ silk screen prints by Daze on the opening night and online.

The gallery and the curator heartily thank Henry Chalfant for letting us show his documentary movie “From Mambo to Hip Hop: A South Bronx Tale.”

Poster Artwork by Tyler Askew.

 

“New York Perspectives”

Christopher “Daze” Ellis / Joe Conzo

Curated by Mode2

22.11 – 21.12.2019

 

Urban Spree Galerie

Revaler Str. 99

10245 Berlin

Opening: Friday 22.11.2019 at 18:30

Exhibition: Tu-Sa – 12:00 – 18:30

Info & Catalogue: contact@urbanspree.com

 

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BIOGRAPHIES: 

 

Chris “Daze” Ellis

Growing up in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, Chris Daze Ellis (b. 1962) was aware from early on of the names and the odd characters that would be dancing along the trains that wove their way through the city. When he started out at the High School of Art & Design in 1976, he found that there was a whole community of very diverse yet like-minded individuals there, also involved with this scene; some of whom would go on to make a name for themselves in the art world.

Being a fan of drawing and comic books already, Daze camouflaged his nighttime activities under his parents’ gaze, exploring and expanding his visual vocabulary, combining the traditional with the dynamism of a new and challenging environment, with stimulus of its own.

Having mastered the medium and the environment, Daze would go on to shape his own personal vision of the world, looking as much inwards as outwards, in the relationship between the trains and walls, and what he could further explore in the studio. The strength of his successful life as an artist in his own right would develop from then on.

From his participation in his first group show, Beyond Words, at the Mudd Club in 1981, before having his own solo show at Fashion Moda (the historical South Bronx art space that bridged the established art world with the raw talent and energy coming out of New York City), Daze embraced the wide horizon that opened up before him.

From then on, Daze began to show in many different cities around the world, whether it be galleries and museum, in solo shows as well as group formats. He has participated in many public or educational art projects around the world, working with students and communities from South Korea to Brazil via Haiti, while often visiting Europe as well, and contributing to New York mural initiatives like the Leap Arts Program or Thrive Collective.

From his appearances in the film Style Wars, to being an art consultant on the Netflix series The Get Down in 2017, to participating in public painting projects from the Star Ferry Terminal in Hong Kong in 1993, painting an entire Hannover train station with fellow artists Lee Quinones and John Crash Matos, or being commissioned for murals by private clients like the law firm, Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton in Washington D.C. 2018; Daze has constantly had his hands on a whole range of different projects.

Daze’s paintings have found themselves in many private collections including Eric Clapton, Natalie Imbruglia, and Madonna. His work can also be found in the permanent collections of The Whitney Museum, NY, Museum of Modern art, NY, The Museum of the city of New York, The Ludwig Museum, Aachen, Yale University art Gallery, New Haven, Addison Museum of American Art at the Phillips Academy, Andover.

Chris Daze Ellis continues to live and work in New York City.

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Joe Conzo

Joe Conzo was born in the Bronx during an era of great upheaval, when the construction of the Cross Bronx Expressway was nearing its end, having destroyed the communities that lay in its path, and condemning those parts of the borough around it to social and economic decline. The apocalyptic landscapes of urban devastation, and the high criminality associated to it are emblematic of that era.

President Truman’s Urban Renewal announced in 1949, ruthlessly applied by Robert Moses, targetted the more modest and ethnically diverse neighbourhoods of New York City whose resistance to forced removal would fall on deaf ears, as private developers grabbed the prime lots. The Bronx represented both the laboratory and the collateral damage for these extreme experiments of urban renewal.

And yet, out of what looked like an urban war zone, the city’s youth began to pick up the pieces, and, out of the desolation around them, began to build their own road out of it. Realising that the state was not going to do anything positive for them, their survival instincts eventually kicked in; and out of the gang culture, the drugs, and the sheer nihilism that had reigned for a while over much of the borough, new and greener shoots were beginning to break through.

Joe Conzo’s cultural capital, and that of his peers, was probably key to his survival and his blossoming during those harsh years; grandson of Dr. Evelina López Antonetty, a political activist who played a huge role in developing educational programmes for Puerto Rican children, and son of Joe Conzo Snr., who was in the thick of the huge Latin music scene of that bridged those decades; hanging with all the main players of that era, and having been the biographer of Tito Puente.

While studying at the Agnes Russell School on the campus of Columbia University, he discovered photography, the medium that would enable him to document what went on around him; from the world of latin culture through his father’s connections, to the collision of art forms that would later be called Hip Hop; a word that eclipses the sum of its parts.

Having lived many ups and downs in the eighties, to a rebirth of sorts, Joe Conzo went on to become a qualified medical nurse, then worked for the New York City Fire Department, being among the first responders on 9/11. At some point along the way, he was reunited with the camera, and began shooting again…

Whether as the photographer of rap crew The Cold Crush Brothers, a hugely influential group of MCs from the early days, or just a boy from the Bronx who had a camera and curious eyes, Joe Conzo’s photos provided reference material to Henry Chalfant ‘s documentary “From Mambo to Hip Hop: A South Bronx Tale.”, and were documented in a book called “Born In The Bronx: A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop”.

His negatives have been digitalised and archived at Cornell University, providing a unique and indispensable resource for those wishing to research the those eras.



Leelo Record Release Show

Leelo is an Estonian born musician who has spent the last three years in Berlin, playing on the streets and at local venues.
Since graduating high school she has lived in several different countries and although originally a classically trained flautist, she is now rocking the singer-songwriter scene. Let’s put it like that: Leelo is really into 90’s music and loves the sound of guitars.

Last year she recorded her self titled debut album at The Famous Gold Watch studio and this October it will be out for you all to listen to!

To celebrate this, Leelo is hosting her official record release show at Urban Spree. There will be special guests, lots of inappropriate jokes and maybe a tiny bit of fun…and of course Leelo with the whole band.

Have you listened to her latest single? No?

Then click on this link:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ena_TLBVXs

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Kirin J Callinan

Kirin J Callinan
+ Support: Faux Real

Return To Center is Kirin J Callinan’s new record, a reconnection with what made him fall in love with music over and over throughout the years, and a very personal exploration of the timeless songwriting tradition passed down and reinterpreted from one generation to the next. Following two albums of inimitable, challenging pop music that garnered global acclaim and marked Callinan as entirely unique, a singular talent, nominations for the Australian Music Prize, support slots for everyone from Crowded House to Tame Impala, a role acting in Jane Campion’s Top Of The Lake and an ARIA Award Nomination, ironically it was singing other peoples’ songs

that felt like the most truthful next step for the swashbuckling Sydney artist.

On Return To Center Callinan’s trademark flamboyance is cut with a newfound fragility that comes curled up in an attempt to do justice to the songs he holds nearest and dearest.
Return To Center collects Callinan reworks of both all-time favourites and last-minute spontaneous additions, songs that have shaped the artist he is today amongst songs that were jammed out of the blue in the studio. Callinan sounds all too in step with Laibach’s teutonic march “Life Is Life”, before completely transforming the twitchy Prince-lite of Momus’ “The Homosexual” into lithe, tender acoustic folk. The Waterboys’ “Whole Of The Moon” is rendered even more melodramatic and heart wrenching than the original and comes off like the theme song to the greatest 80s sitcom you never saw, while Randy Newman’s “Pretty Boy” sticks largely faithful to the sombre original, and Public Image Limited’s “Rise” ascends amidst Celtic guitars and television news clips. At the chronological and spiritual center of the record – the eye of the storm – lies the title track and sole original composition. A stark, spacious
instrumental, “Return To Center’s serenity is interrupted by maniacal laughter, assumedly Callinan’s.

Recording was swift – tracking a song per day, with a few up the sleeve for overdubs, mixing and mastering. With a lengthy list of prior collaborators that has included Mark Ronson, Jimmy Barnes, Mac Demarco, Weyes Blood, Connan Mockasin and Alex
Cameron to name a few, the open (garage) door policy was maintained for Return To Center. First luminary to lift the shutters was producer Francois Tetaz whose zeitgeist work with Gotye is legendary. More than a producer to this project, Francois’ enthusiasm to work with Kirin is in the DNA off his concept. A cast of outlaws followed that included Drew Erickson, Benji Lysaght, Stella Mozgawa, Dave Elitch, Jasper Leek and Holiday Sidewinder, gathered in the garage
of his temporary Silverlake abode, delighting in the perverse subversion of the capitalist system and the challenge of completing a record with such clear time and financial constraints. With the roller door open to the street just weeks before he was due to be evicted, they merrily blasted through the set with no time to second guess or overthink and as a result, Return To Center retains an instinctive, vulnerable edge,
emerging as Callinan’s most tender yet celebratory record yet.

Return To Center glimmers with what Callinan describes as a“corporate spiritual” radiance. It is a punk rock meditation on record making, music past and present. For Callinan it slices through a contradictory and confusing year of exaggerations and misrepresentations to be his ‘Return to Center’ – sounds, songs, lyrics, performance. Whatever it is and however it was made, Return To Center transcends to a triumph.

Presented by Shameless/Limitless & Melt! Booking

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Dälek • Debmaster

Veteran agitators dälek have never been ones to stick within the rigid parameters of genre. A group who seemingly hold the utmost contempt for conservative expectations regarding form, instead pioneering a volatile and timeless strain of hip-hop, drawing as much from My Bloody Valentine as Public Enemy. These practitioners of noise fuelled depravity are back with a whole new album, entitled Endangered Philosophies, their follow up to last years Asphalt for Eden, scheduled to come out via Ipecac Recordings September 1 2017.

With Dälek, the flow has often been usurped by scorched textures, the product of synthetic decay, themes flitting from pungent political rage through to outright Dionysian frenzy. On Endangered Philosophies, the lyrics are more focused and at the forefront than ever before, and MC Dälek’s new experiments with rhyme styles and flow makes for a vital concoction. There’s no doubt about it, Endangered Philosophies is a work of guttural catharsis, it is a call to arms…

Within the context of the current political landscape, the title Endangered Philosophies certainly brings to mind pertinent issues of moment, notably the rampant rise of anti-intellectualism, as well as the all too rapid erosion of genuinely progressive values in the face of fearful reactionary forces. In MC Dälek’s own words…“Endangered Philosophies is a very introspective record about very external forces. This isn’t about one listen… it’s about your evolving perception when you immerse yourself in the layers of sound and words. Endangered Philosophies is a record about the RIGHT NOW and yet will resonate differently each time it is listened to, in a word….timeless.” (Rolling Stone)

Dälek have been prone to outbursts of pummeling extremity, yet their sound is anything but one dimensional; with viscous dark-ambient soundscapes congealing atop their incessant beats, a dual focus on brute force and disembodied unease. And still, Dälek continue to evolve, as Endangered Philosophies takes a new approach to source material, this time making use of material sent to them by people they have friendships and relationships with including Toronto based Metz, manipulating and sampling in the same way they would use record samples.

Although the group have evolved their sound over the years, they continue to collaborate with the same behind the scenes crew who’ve been with them from the beginning, from the production team, to the artist behind the cover art (Paul Romano). Endangered Philosophies captures so many elements of past Dälek but in a new way, easily matching any of their earlier output in terms of sheer unbridled intensity.

At this stage in their career they have elevated to a frankly peerless stature; with next year marking 20 years since the release of their pivotal debut album Negro Necro Nekros, and having previously collaborated with a host of like-minded visionaries; ranging from Krautrock legends Faust, through to the 90s electronic act Techno Animal – a similarly restless project comprised of Kevin Martin (The Bug, King Midas Sound) and Justin Broadrick (Godflesh, Jesu). Fans will be thrilled – but not too surprised – to discover that with Endangered Philosophies, the group once again charge forward, continuing to resist stagnation in all of its forms.

+ Debmaster



No More Crew: Jan Kaláb, Pasta Oner, Michal Škapa

NO MORE CREW

KALÁB / PASTA / ŠKAPA

A strong trio. Grew up together. Long-standing friendships. Shared experience. Rocket engines. Parallel beginnings. Trajectories that have diverged over time, but remain firmly connected, consecrated by the code of graffiti. The No More Crew brotherhood.

An exhibition built around the confrontation of its participants – a trio of friends, all distinct figures, and not only in terms of the Czech art scene. The mutual confrontation comes at no risk. Jan Kaláb, Pasta Oner and Michal Škapa are equals. What they share is tenacity, ambition, drive, vigor, audacity, humor, and every now and then also a wall, as well as mutual friends and their common age. What distinguishes them is their approach, form, tools, the venues of their solo exhibitions, the locations of their respective studios, and the number of their children.

With the soul of an architect, Jan Kaláb easily conquers the third dimension not only in his murals, but also in his canvases. He has grown to embrace the painter within, and although his forte is the creation of objects he has been chiseling away at geometric abstraction, discovering spaces interior and without, regardless of the clichéd expression “that’s been done.”

The same could be said of Pasta Oner. It is possible to cite the clearly visible sources of inspiration, identify the specific paraphrases. Yet one must also take into account the force and accuracy with which he mirrors the conservative Central European mindset. How spot-on is his commentary on the bad habits of consumerism, or the directness with which he tackles the large format through his short post-pop messages.

 

Michal Škapa, by contrast, works with the moment of replication, the multiplication of a graphic element, with a hand patently the descendant of an expert graffiti artist. His style is ornamental, rhythmic, abstract and concrete at the same time. He is the draughtsman of his canvases, the transmitter of symbols, creator of expansive mural-format comics with unsettling subject matter.

The exhibition No More Crew at Urban Spree Galerie presents a trio of disparate and yet splendidly and mutually complementary artists. Their work defies being simply the result of the overused epithet “drawing on street art”, and at the same time any confrontation with their work requires such a label. Space, place, city, symbol, sign. Something for everybody.

 

Biographies:

Michal Škapa (*1978) alias TRON belongs to the most expressive wave of Czech (Prague) writers with many achievements to his credit. He is engaged in countless graphic activities with the magazines “Free Magazine” and “Upstream”, ranging from festival visuals, books, CD covers for bands, web design, and the creation of original fonts, to the design of posters and invitations to arts events. His graphics projects of the recent period include Names Festival, Kick the Shit! Bitch!, OBR, the Thick-skinned Moviegoers’ Festival for the Aero Movie Theater, IFP, visuals for the Bigg Boss label, etc. In addition to computer graphics, who also produces drawings and airbrush works. He brings his vivid imagination to bear on graffiti and visual effects. Member of CAP, NUTS, DSK a TOYZ!

www.834.cz

 

Pasta Oner is one of the most original figures on the Czech contemporary art scene. Ever a creative mind, Pasta Oner has, in the recent years and in keeping with his graffiti and street art roots which go back to the turn of the millenium, focused on asserting himself within the system of independent and publicly funded galleries. He weds pop-art to cartoon, transcending both categories.

Although he touches, at the core of his philosophy, on the principles of post-production, Pasta Oner stands apart from the current trend of post-conceptualism and blazes his trail in the Czech art world as a media-savvy and widely known, if slightly controversial artist.

The work of Pasta Oner presents an original, ironic commentary on contemporary popular culture. Pasta Oner’s traditional themes of obsession with money, sex, religion, luxury goods and the consumerist notions of beauty are translated into new contexts characterised by the technologisation of life, the increasing speed of information and the short attention-span aesthetics of today’s culture. It is into this world, of which Pasta – like all of us – is a part, that he brings his engaged art.

www.pastaoner.cz

 

When Jan Kaláb was born in 1978 in Czechoslovakia, graffiti was not to be seen in the Eastern World. In the nineties, as the country was opening itself to western influences, he became one of the pioneer of the local scene, and founded an iconic crew, the DSK. Sleepless nights around train yards, light tubes at police stations and above all hard work on his style: he went through all the classical steps of a writer’s career. Through Europe, he made a name for himself as Cakes. Next step to the Hall of fame: New York, where he made a big impression by painting whole cars in 2000, alongside with Key and Rome. Around the same time, he found a new way to push his own limits and under the name Point, he sculpted and installed huge abstracts letters in the streets and on the walls. This was another form of graffiti, in daylight, and without a spray, but truthful to the spirit of competition and innovation of the urban scene. Those sculptures lead him to abstraction, a path he’s been exploring through canvas from 2007, using acrylic painting and brushes. In the meantime, this admirer of Kupka graduated from the Academy of fine Arts of Prague – becoming the first Czech writer to do so.

Jan Kaláb had his first solo exhibition in 2008 in Prague. Others solos took place in Romania, Argentina, Germany or in the United States.

www.jankalab.com

 

Škapa, Kaláb and Pasta often exhibited together (for example: 2009 –Storage, Prague, The Chemistry Gallery, 2011 – Boutique, Prague, The Chemistry Gallery, 2011 – Can You Dig It?, Brussels/Belgium, Pragues House) and they organised shows or met many times together at group shows (2008 – City Celebrities, Brno, Moravská galerie in Brno, 2008 – Names (streetart festival), Prague, Trafacka, 2010 – Metropolis, Shanghai/China, EXPO 2010, Czech pavilion, 2010 – Corners, Shanghai, Beijing/China, Source, 2010 – Metropolis, Prague, DOX, 2012 – Possessed by the City, Prague, Galerie hlavního města Prahy – Městská knihovna).

 

No More Crew

A solo group show by Jan Kaláb, Pasta Oner and Michal Škapa

Opening Reception on Thursday, May 18th at 18:30

Exhibition: May 19th to June 11th,

Tu-Su: 12:00-19:00

press enquiries: diana@urbanspree.com

gallery enquiries: galerie@urbanspree.com

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Alex Cameron + Helen Fry

Shameless/Limitless, ByteFM and Powerline Agency feel something approaching proud, albeit a kind of proud that is tinged with generalized aches and pains and a dash of anxiety, at the reality of presenting Alex Cameron (w/ band!) + Helen Fry at Urban Spree on May 26th.

Tickets on sale now on TixforGigs and at KOKA36. Last I checked they’re going fast as Al n Roy fleeing an occurrence better left unexplained and unexplored. Don’t say you weren’t warned.

Doors: 20:00
Helen Fry: 21:00
Alex Cameron: 22:00

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When you talk about Alex Cameron and Roy Molloy you’re talking about the online cowboys in the Wild West days of the World Wide Web. For those who haven’t logged on, Roy Molloy is my good friend and business partner, he plays saxophone with me and also owns 50% of our entertainment business The Crawfish. That’s one half of it, and if you want to know what we’re really about, what’s really at the elbow of the whole scenario, just look at all the things you wish you’d done differently. All the things you stopped yourself from doing on account of the fear of failure, or rejection. Weigh that up against your ambitions. Think about your work ethic. We’re reclaiming failure as an act of progress. An act of learning. Something to celebrate. People have short memories like that. Short enough to forget what happened even two generations ago. Scared to acknowledge that we’ve made some bad calls and we’re likely to again. Pushed the wrong buttons. Forgot to carry the one. Take a look around, I see class wars between educated critics and reality television life gurus. I see bronzed Californians preaching inaction through tightly edited frames. I see Americanized satire falling short from its killer blow. It’s not enough.

Me n Roy got into show business young. To be the best. To have the truest sounding words. The kind of words that confess and redeem in the same breath. True things of beauty; ugly and naked just lingering there to be heard. We play with words. Turn em inside out. That’s some good song writing. You wanna get online and check out the impact we’ve had in Australia that’s your call. We’ve played on the country’s biggest stages, hell, the first time I ever sang in public was to a sold out Sydney Opera House. That’s if you don’t count Karaoke, which I am also very good at. My song is Billy Idol’s ‘White Wedding.’

I was trained by 85-year-old Jewish Entertainer Steve Ostrow. Look him up, Steve is a sexual revolutionist, he founded the Continental baths in Manhattan in 1968. A confident, bisexual and classically trained opera singer, Steve had me focused on vocal delivery, “let them hear the lyrics, that’s your only job.” Steve took me into another dimension. Here was a guy, operating at a time when bigotry was a matter of societal standard, and he had the vision to use words and entertainment to bolster the strength of his community.

You think about that kind of liberation, then you take our current situation. Think about modern times. I see HBO airing fantasy shows with dogs committing infanticide. Millions tune in. Nothing fantastic about it. Just the filthy Soap dreams of a should-be recluse. Torture porn from 8-9, satirical news from 10-11. Quick LOL and a wank then off to bed. And I’m not even a cynic. I’m on the grid. I’ve got a Google phone and an iPad. I was raised by the sea, white as a broken wave. But I know when enough’s enough. I know when a generation’s been subdued by apathetic music and the love song is more about the having than the being had.

I heard it’s a dangerous time to be online. You got the comments sections, and the thumbs down, but I ain’t afraid to commit to theme. That’s a risk I can afford. I ain’t scared of Internet scrutiny, or the foreverness of text. I refuse to destroy the emotion in my work. The only way forward is unedited, uncensored, and without inhibition. That’s how you get to the crux; you find what we all don’t want to admit. I’ve learned to reveal what I want to unlearn. I cast a light on the darkness and in doing so understand love and compassion. Fear is to be confronted, and to learn strictly requires failure – over and over. Celebrate failure with Jumping The Shark.

Some people say me and Roy use mongrel tongues created by the internet, American-Australian slang. Others say we breathe life into a contemporary greyscale. Providing culture to an otherwise empty and lonely place. All I know is a word’s meaning can change depending on who utters the thing; and so we present characters – shapes are morphed and stories are delivered.

And I’ll be frank — some of my stories got some low themes and some low tragic figures. Not tragic figures like Hamlet (I ain’t no Willy Shakespeare), but modern tragics. I got sex addicts, internet addicts, love tragics. I got villains, cheats, violent guys flooded with hormones and false bravado. They’re all in there. Good stories need em. Need villains. Some of these characters do and say things that I never would. Shameful things. But that’s what villains do.

And so we present to you tales of failure and self destruction. The ever-flowing undercurrent of sadness. The dismal slip beneath an entirely out of control mainstream. This is focused story telling. It’s Phone-Noire. It’s a collection of four-minute stories written to provide you with insight into the inner workings of failed ambitions. Come see a show. Witness the elation in the crowd. The smiles. The weight lifted. Finally something is being said. Feel the sweet relief of confession. It is OK. We failed. Join the side of the enlightened. Jump The Shark.
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Exceptionally on point flyer by Natalia Portnoy
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Shameless/Limitless lives online at http://shamelesslimitless.tumblr.com/and https://www.instagram.com/shamelesslimitless/

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