We found – 9 articles for 1990

Royal Trux + Furious Few & Samara Lubelski

Support: Furious Few & Samara Lubelski

Doors: 8 pm Start: 9 pm
if it is nice weather Samara will do an Open Air Set in the garden. ♥

In the 1990’s Royal Trux established themselves as one of the greatest rock groups of that hallowed era. With albums of extrasensory scope ranging from 1990s Twin Infinitives (which belongs to the special category of albums whose impact may take decades to be measured), to 1993’s Cats and Dogs (with its seamless blend of classic roots, grunge, and punk) to 2000’s Pound for Pound (inhabiting a well-worn coat of southern hard-rock boogie), they reinvented the group concept born with the Rolling Stones (whose music inspired the duo with a definitive template with which to fuck), accepting nothing less than “The World’s Greatest Rock and Roll band” as an opening proposition!
Jennifer Herrema (vocals, moog, guitar, melodica, sticks and stones, pots and pans) and Neil Hagerty (vocals and guitarist) were both in the Washington, D.C. area where they met and, as teenagers, formed Royal Trux while living in an abandoned warehouse space near the New York Avenue bridge a few miles from Union Station. The name was an evocation of their omnidirectional headspace and abilities — plus, Jennifer grew up skateboarding, moving to roller skating after removing the trux and wheels off her board grafting them onto a pair of skates, giving her an unequaled ability to maneuver … even then, it was all about the TRUX.

The idea was to play with what little equipment and resources they had and make the most of it by starting musically with the simplicity of blues progressions. The blues also happened to fit the bill for a band called “Pussy Galore” that recruited Hagerty to fill the position of guitarist and tutor (teaching them all how to play the Rolling Stones’ Exile on Main Street album) in exchange for money, equipment and a place to stay in New York. The move to NYC (Jennifer into the YMCA, Neil with the band) was fortuitous, but the perceived similarities between the two acts weren’t much beyond initial chord progressions and of course the unmistakable sound of Hagerty’s unparalleled guitar style.

The Trux walked a different talk, one with a more elusive, at times counter-intuitive attitude. Hagerty and Herrema were by nature loners, drug abusers and intellectuals; they stood out among the many art school “bands” in NYC in the late 80s. Playing with a revolving cast of freaks, fellow-travelers, and influences allowed them to discard the tradition of a “band” with “members.” Listening to the records nobody else cared to play anymore, they chose to stake out a post no-wave stance shot through with aspects of classic New Yorkia — Godz, Lovin’ Spoonful, Lou Reed and Television all fit the bill — sifting it through in a personal manner that eventually became known as the “lo-fi” genre. In this tactile fashion, they gained notoriety for their unconventional music and ideas, presenting themselves at live shows and elsewhere with an aesthetic marked by indifference and debauchery.

Royal Trux’s first tangible music releases were a song credited to them on Pussy Galore’s Right Now LP (“Fix-It”) (1987) and two tracks, “Luminous Dolphin” and “Cut You Loose,” (1988) on a ROIR cassette compilation . . . but it was the end of 1988 that saw them release their own, self-titled LP for not much more than $500. With no label or distribution in place it was the music that propelled their trajectory (not money, nepotism, or connections) — this was what it took to launch new beginnings in the music world/landscape at that time. Not long after, Drag City and Domino came calling, and an attempt to dominate worldwide was undertaken. Up through 1995, via several records, tours, a film (What is Royal Trux?) and a relentless promotion campaign (including placing their “art” as TV adverts on the sci-fi network and others ), their portfolio expanded, leading to a contract with Virgin Records, who evaluated them to be necessary listening on a big-time level. It could only have been done with fresh eyes and ears and the understanding that new realms of possibility could be accessed by Truxian imagination and vision.

After signing with Virgin in 1994 for a three-album stint, Royal Trux began calling themselves the “World’s Greatest Royal Trux Boogie Band.” Who could argue with that? Few even knew what it meant. After the Virgin albums they returned to Drag City with a diverse series of sounds on Accelerator, Veterans of Disorder and Pound for Pound. As always, they were open for business and taking offers, confronting the world from where they stood on the street, and seeking to jack it for all they could. Over a decade has passed and the pair’s music continues to sound just as progressive, vital, and confounding.

Beyond the genre-setting and -defying music and the genius of Hagerty’s playing, they were fronted by a willfully non-archetypal female singer whose stance became it’s own archetype over the years, as the world caught on to the need for a new breed. Subsequently, a generation of females looked to Jennifer Herrema for inspiration, emulation and commodification.
Royal Trux have done as much to define the look, attitude and sound of rock & roll as any other group in the rock & roll era. This is due to their Bitches Brew approach: “everything in the pot whether you like it or not,” deriving from world music, punk rock, jazz, metal, electronic, southern, teeny-bop and all the rest. In the tradition of the blues, through appropriation and evaluation, Royal Trux changed the way we think of music — it is no surprise that their Truxian language has been further absconded with and recited uncredited for years. Such organic perpetuation only happens with original thought worthy of its own definition. This was and is Royal Trux: innovators and dedicated lifers among the sounds they love. Odds are, whether you know it or not, if you find yourself reading this you’ve been touched by Royal Trux. But only in the right places!

Now you know a little — but Royal Trux got a lot of things to come, including the forthcoming upcoming fly-in tour of Euro and UK festivals, as well as a musical and journalistic trip back to Austin. Texas, where last year’s Psych-fest was cancelled by rising water, this time in the name of that which we call (the new) SXSW. They took to the stages and played with no more than a day to prepare, creating unhinged music from their the solid undercarriage of their songs. With more shows in the pipeline, all we can wonder is all we’ve ever wondered about Royal Trux — what’s next?

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Foto: © Jen Neil



Jim Avignon: Permanent Jetlag

Urban Spree is proud to invite you to a special summer program around the Berlin-based artist Jim Avignon. 

In the first part, Urban Spree Galerie will show „Permanent Jetlag„, a new solo show by Jim Avignon, his first exhibition since 2 years in the german capital. The Opening Reception will be on Friday, June 30th and the exhibition will run until July 23rd.

In the second part, „Spectacular“ is a special music festival over 4 days designed & curated by Jim Avignon, Urban Spree, and Sylvie Astii with live performances in the Galerie on a custom-built stage designed by Jim and in the Concert Room. The Festival will be on July 5th to July 8th.

The exhibition „Permanent Jetlag“ and the music program „Spectacular“ illustrate and combine the two facets of Jim Avignon, a recognized visual artist, musician and performer through his moniker Neonangin.

Jim Avignon is a painter, illustrator and conceptual artist. Always ready to confront the establishment he is torn between pop art, street art, Picasso on acid or simply being the fastest painter in the world. His signature style consists of vivid colours, a biting humor, unpretentious materials and a mind numbing output.

Jim Avignon’s exhibition „Permanent Jetlag“ at Urban Spree Galerie is about the balancing act of virtual life and real life. He depicts how the internet and social media have gradually changed society, and he also addresses man’s tragic, and often comical attempts to keep up with technology. On one hand the world is getting smaller yet in our minds it keeps getting bigger, making it difficult to be everywhere at the same time.

Avignon’s narrative motives are a potpourri of political and societal topics, art, pop culture and characters from fairytales and fables. His paintings serve as a stage for diverse protagonists from figuration, cartoons, anime and a fantasy world. Animals embody the human condition while the unknown lurks behind a façade of cheerfulness.

In Avignon’s fantasy world interchangeable freaks from the catalogue of postmodern society stand around, as their lively inanimate facial expressions reveal a mix of emotions, boredom, indecisiveness and resignation.

Sampling, cover versions and epiphenomena, like gamification, are central concepts in his creative work, they are references to the conflicting poles of visual art, music, mass media and the industry.

Jim Avignon curated a music festival that will happen alongside his exhibition „Permanent Jetlag.” Longtime comrades will perform in the middle of the exhibition space. Jim Avignon created a stage specifically for this occasion. The entire show will be transformed into a walk through installation.

Jim Avignon has been living and working in Berlin for more than 20 years. In the 1990s he adorned clubs with his decorations and became known as the ‚painter of the techno scene‘. In 2013 he unleashed controversy when he staged a flashmob to paint over his landmark mural on the East Side Gallery without permission. Velocity and change have always been key issues in his creative work. The title of one of his first exhibitions was “highspeedworld.” In 1993 he already titled a painting “spoilsport in the internet.”

Permanent Jetlag

Urban Spree Galerie

Opening Reception: 30.06.2017 at 19:00

Exhibition: 01.07.2017 – 23.07.2017

Finissage on 23.07.2017 from 16:00 with the artist

Tu-Su / 12:00 – 19:00

Galerie Enquiries: galerie@urbanspree.com

Press Enquiries: diana@urbanspree.com

 



„Berlin Calling“ Book Launch Party and Discussion

The American, Berlin-based author Paul Hockenos will present his latest book Berlin Calling: A Story of Anarchy, Music, the Wall and the Birth of the New Berlin (The New Press) at Urban Spree Galerie on June 17, 2017.

An exhilarating journey through the subcultures, occupied squats, and late-night scenes in the anarchic first few years of Berlin after the fall of the wall Berlin Calling is a gripping account of the 1989 „peaceful revolution“ in East Germany that upended communism and the tumultuous years of artistic ferment, political improvisation, and pirate utopias that followed. It’s the story of a newly undivided Berlin when protest and punk rock, bohemia and direct democracy, techno and free theater were the order of the day.

In a story stocked with fascinating characters from Berlin’s highly politicized undergrounds—including playwright Heiner Müller, cult figure Blixa Bargeld of the industrial band Einstürzende Neubauten, the internationally known French Wall artist Thierry Noir, the American multimedia artist Danielle de Picciotto (founder of Love Parade), and David Bowie during his Ziggy Stardust incarnation—Hockenos argues that the DIY energy and raw urban vibe of the early 1990s shaped the new Berlin and still pulses through the city today.

Just as Mike Davis captured Los Angeles in his City of Quartz, Berlin Calling is a unique account of how Berlin became hip, and of why it continues to attract creative types from the world over.

Paul Hockenos is an American journalist and author who writes for The Nation, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Foreign Policy, the New York Times, and many other media outlets. He has held prize fellowships with the American Academy in Berlin, the European Journalism College, the German Marshall Fund of the United States, and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He is the author of three books, including Joschka Fischer and the Making of the Berlin Republic, and lives in Berlin.

“Can unruly artists change the world? Or do they just provide the soundtrack to history? The Berlin of the 1980s is famous for two things: a wild counterculture and the surprising end of the Cold War. Paul Hockenos, who knows the city inside out, brings them together in a fast-paced, sometimes astonishing story of underground clubs, squatters, and dissidents.” Brian Ladd, author of The Ghosts of Berlin

 

18:00 Opening of Berlin photographer Stefan Schilling exhibition on Mitte 1990

18:30 Open discussion with Paul Hockenos led by Felix Denk of Dummy magazine

19:00 – Planet’s former DJ Disko Daniel Bier on the console